Best Flowers to plant in the Winter for cool season color?

Best Flowers to plant in the Winter for cool season color?

We found this great article from Sunset Magazine and wanted to share it with our customers.

Great plants for fall and winter color
Cool-season flowers bring a splash of color to your garden right when you need it most.
Where freezes are infrequent, you can plant cheery pansies, snapdragons, English daisies, and more from early fall through late winter. They'll overwinter, filling your borders, containers, and pocket gardens with months of flower power.

In cold climates, plants will die off in winter but can be planted again in spring.

Look for sturdy plants with good leaf color in six-packs and 4-inch containers. Click ahead for some of our favorite picks for the cool season.

Calendula (Calendula officinalis)
Daisy-like calendula provides easy color from late fall through spring in mild-winter climates, and are long lasting in a vase.

Choose classic orange and bright yellow, or opt for subtler shades of apricot, cream, and soft yellow. Branching plants are 1 to 2 feet high and 1 to 1½ feet wide and look great as masses of color or in a container.

Calendula plants take full sun and moderate water. They will tolerate many soils as long as they have good drainage. Remove the spent flowers to prolong bloom.

Candytuft (Iberis)
Candytuft plants grow 8 to 12 inches high and wide; their narrow, shiny dark green leaves look great all year.
Pure white flower clusters are carried on stems long enough to cut for bouquets. Choose 'Alexander's White' (pictured), ‘Autumnale’, or ‘Autumn Snow; they bloom in spring and again in fall.

Plants thrive in full sun or part shade and regular water. Candytuft needs well-drained soil and should be sheared lightly after bloom to stimulate new growth.

 

English daisy (Bellis perennis)
Plump, perky English daises make great edging plants. Or slip a few into your lawn for unexpected bursts of color.



Dark green leaves are 1 to 2 inches long and form rosettes to 8 inches wide. Pink, rose, red, or white flowers are borne on 3- to 6-inch stems.

Deadhead to prolong bloom. English daisy needs regular water and prefers a bit of shade in hot climates.

Iceland poppy (Papaver nudicaule)
With their tall, leafless stems that dance in the breeze, Iceland poppies are graceful companions to many cool-season plants.



Iceland poppies grow 1 to 2 feet tall; flowers are cream, orange, pink, rose, salmon, yellow, or white. They need full sun and moderate to regular water.

In mild-winter climates, set out plants in fall or winter for months of cool-season color. Pick flowers freely to prolong the show.

In cold winter areas, sow seed in earliest spring for summer bloom; or set out plants in fall for bloom the following year.

Ornamental kale
Giant rosettes of frilly leaves in lavender, rose, white, and creamy yellow make ornamental kales favorite additions to the winter garden.



Because these showy cabbage relatives tolerate cold weather and can hold their brilliant color all the way into spring, they're ideal for display on porches, patios, or beside entryways, or for massing in garden beds. They grow 1 to 2 feet tall.

Plant kale as soon as possible so heads develop fully; the color will intensify in the cold. Plant in full sun or light shade. Water regularly and feed every other week with a dilute liquid fertilizer like fish emulsion.

Pansy
These low-growing plants (6 to 10 inches tall) with five-petaled flowers are top sellers year after year for good reason.



They deliver lots of blooms over a long period, come in a huge range of colors ― both solids and bicolors ― and bloom through winter in much of the West. ('Dynamite Blotch' is pictured here.)

The large-flowered, faced varieties may catch your eye first in nurseries. But when planted en masse, nonfaced, single-colored varieties are often more striking.

English primrose
Most primroses bloom in spring or summer, but English primrose (as well as fairy primroses and Chinese primroses) are also excellent choices for winter color.



Circular flowers arise either alone or in clusters from a foliage rosette. English primrose (pictured here) comes in nearly every color and grows 8 to 12 inches high and 9 inches wide.

Primroses can take full sun in cooler climates, part to full shade otherwise. All need regular water.

Snapdragon
Snapdragons are among the best flowers for borders and cuttings, and they’ll bloom all winter in mild-winter climates. (In cold climates, plant in spring.)



Flowers come in many colors and are divided into upper and lower “jaws.” Some have double flowers, some are bell-shaped, and some blooms look like azaleas.

Flowers shoot from 1-3 feet tall and 6 inches to 2 feet wide. Set out plants from fall to spring in mild-winter areas. All take full sun and regular water.

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